Early Start Partners Symposium 2019
"A Beautiful Tapestry: Weaving Cultural Awareness into Early Intervention"

The Department of Developmental Services,
the California Department of Education,
and the WestEd Center for Prevention & Early Intervention
are pleased to invite you to participate in the Early Start Partners Symposium.

The Early Start Partners Symposium (ESPS) has been developed to address the needs of early intervention service providers, service coordinators, and family support professionals across Early Start partner agencies. ESPS offers a comprehensive, in-person professional development and networking opportunity for the entire Early Start community. The Symposium agenda provides timely information about topics of critical interest to both seasoned and new Early Start personnel. Please join us!

May 23-24, 2019
San Diego, CA

Registration Deadline: April 12 (or earlier if capacity is reached)
Fee: $90

Location:
Wyndham San Diego Bayside
1355 N. Harbor Drive
San Diego, Ca 92101
(619) 232-3861


HOTEL RESERVATIONS: CLICK HERE.
A special room rate of $125 single/double is available until April 23, 2019 (or earlier if capacity is reached). If you call the hotel to make your reservation, identify yourself as a participant of the Early Start Event and ask for the WestEd Special rate.

Registrant Information


Are you a parent of a child with special needs? *

Day One General Session
9:00 am-10:15 am
(All registrants attend the general session.)

Cultivating Cultural Humility  
Presenter: Senta Greene, Full Circle Consulting Systems, Inc.
California is the most culturally diverse state in the country. It’s very likely that the children and families you interact with on a daily basis come from cultures, religions, and value systems that are different from your own. “Cultural competence” has become a popular term to describe the ability to work effectively with such a wide variety of families, but what does being a “culturally competent professional” really mean? Can cultural competence ever really be achieved? This session explores “cultural humility,” a new framework for interacting with and supporting diverse families.

Day One Morning Session:
10:30 am-12:00 pm
(Choose one session to attend.)

1.A. Evidence-Based Social and Emotional Interventions for Families: A Look at Current Projects
Maura Gibney, South Central Los Angeles Regional Center; Yvette Baptiste, Eastern Los Angeles Family Resource Center; Freda Kaprielian, KC KIDS Pre-school
This session will focus on innovative ways that programs are implementing EBPs that focus on improving social and emotional outcomes. Learn about a Mental Health Services Act-funded project implementing evidence-based supports and services to enhance family relationships, improve social and emotional development, and improve identification of social and emotional delays. Additionally, learn about a model of implementing the Neurorelational Framework for both providers and families.

1.B. Early Start 101: Orientation to the Early Start System
Linda Landry, Family Resource Center Network of California; Sarah Burton and Sarah Franco, San Diego Regional Center; Hope Michel or Renee Welch, HOPE Infant Family Support Program
If you are new to Early Start, this session is for you! This interactive session for new staff clarifies the who, what, when, where, and how of the California Early Start system. Presenters offer insight from the regional center, local education agency, and family resource center/parent support perspectives, to give participants the “whole picture” of Early Start. program. 

1.C. Transition: Making It Work
Barbara Newman, Central Valley Regional Center; Marlene Pena, EPU Children’s Center; Ron Pekarek, Tulare County Office of Education 
Interagency collaboration—it’s vitally important for successful transitions from Early Start, but how does it happen? How can agencies work together to support families and their children during this time of change? Some regions across the state have figured out how to partner successfully to ensure a smooth transition for families when their child turns three. Hear from a team of agencies who will be sharing their tips and strategies for collaborating during the transition process..

1.D. Parent Coaching: Relationship-based Approach to Early Intervention
Denise Carbon, Special Advantage 
In this session, participants will learn how to effectively implement parent coaching in early intervention. The presenter will cover how to coach parents in early intervention and actively engage parents in this “guide on the side” model of service delivery.

1.E. What’s Next for IDEA Part C?
Sharon Walsh, Walsh-Taylor Incorporated
National policy consultant Sharon Walsh, Walsh-Taylor Incorporated, will provide an update on recent federal action impacting services for young children with disabilities and their families, including federal legislation, policies, and budget activities that impact education, social services, and health care. Ms. Walsh will also discuss how other states are addressing accountability, national activities, and future OSEP plans for systems improvement sustainability, and perspective on California’s SSIP implementation and evaluation efforts.
 
1.F. Learn the Signs. Act Early.
Debbie Sarmento, Family Resource Centers Network of California
What’s new from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) “Learn the Signs. Act Early.” campaign? Come learn about new tools and updates, as well as the suite of free, family-friendly materials available through the CDC “Learn the Signs. Act Early.” program.

Choose One (1) Day 1 Morning Session to Attend: *

Day One Early Afternoon Session:
1:15 pm-2:45 pm
(Choose one session to attend.)

1.G. Outcomes Workshop: How to Write Meaningful, Functional Outcomes (Part 1 of 2)
Michelle Oliver, Santa Clara County Office of Education; Howard Doi, San Andreas Regional Center
This interactive workshop offers specific information and resources for developing Individualized Family Service Plan (IFSP) outcomes for families in Early Start. Participants will practice writing functional and complete child and family outcome statements. Participants who enroll in Part 1 of this two-part session will automatically be enrolled in Part 2.
 
1.H. Privilege and Prejudice: Addressing Hidden Biases (Part 1 of 2)
Barbara Stroud, Ph.D., California Association for Infant Mental Health
Recognizing and dismantling our unconscious negative beliefs about those who are different from us is hard, everyday work, but it’s critically important for working effectively with families served by Early Start. This two-part presentation will discuss privilege and bias, and facilitate self-discovery in a confidential and non-judgmental environment. Participants will receive the tools that all professionals need to become aware of, and overcome, their internalized biases. Participants who enroll in Part 1 of this two-part session will automatically be enrolled in Part 2.
 
1.I. Cultivating Cultural Humility (Part 1 of 2)
Senta Greene, Full Circle Consulting Systems, Inc.
In this follow-up to the general session, attendees will engage further exploring “cultural humility,” a new framework for interacting with and supporting diverse families. Participants who enroll in Part 1 of this two-part session will automatically be enrolled in Part 2.
 
1.J. Motivational Interviewing: Supporting Relationships and Imbedding Motivational Interviewing – Personally and Organizationally (Part 1 of 2)
Liz Barnett, MSW, Ph.D.
Do you have trouble motivating the families or staff that you support? “Motivational interviewing” is a collaborative communication style for strengthening a person's own motivation and commitment to change by addressing the common problem of ambivalence. In this session, you will learn about motivation and the four stages of motivational interviewing and practice the micro-skills needed to help people get over “Motivation Mountain.” Next, Dive deeper into motivational interviewing. Have an opportunity to explore creative ways of integrating these approaches into their workplace. Participants will come away with strategies and tools for creating a plan that can be tailored to individual settings and organizations. Ideas, tools and resources for supporting practice and evaluation of Motivational Interviewing will be shared. Participants who enroll in Part 1 of this two-part session will automatically be enrolled in Part 2.

1.K. Learning from the Experts: Best Practices in Supporting and Serving Children with Hearing and Vision Impairments and Their Families (Part 1 of 2)
Julie Rems-Smario, California Department of Education; Karen Nutt, California Braille Institute; Jamie Wei, San Diego Regional Center
Children receiving Early Start services should be regularly screened for vision and hearing. This session explores best practices in screening, and shares resources and strategies for developing a screening program, documenting assessment results, and referring families to services. Learn about the unique needs of children who are blind and have low vision, and children who are deaf and hard of hearing, and how Early Start professionals can connect these infants and toddlers and their families to appropriate services post-screening. Learn how to leverage community resources and work cross-collaboratively with other professionals and agencies to equip your staff with the tools and training needed to provide appropriate interventions and supports to children with vision and hearing impairments and their families. Participants who enroll in Part 1 of this two-part session will automatically be enrolled in Part 2.
 
1.L. Helping Parents Help Themselves
Patty Moore, Alpha Resource Center; Katie Hornberger, Disability Rights California
One way to support families whose children are receiving Early Start services is to teach and empower them to find relevant laws and regulations, and to know and understand their rights. These skills are especially important once a family transitions out of Early Start, and must advocate for themselves and their child within unfamiliar systems. This presentation will demonstrate how professionals can locate, navigate, and communicate current laws, regulations, and policies pertaining to Early Start, and support families in finding and using this information in various settings.
 
1.M. Funding the Future: Grant Writing for Sustainability of Improved Practices
Maura Gibney, South Central Los Angeles Regional Center; Arin Gabrielyan, Heluna Health
How do you find the resources to keep training new staff, refreshing the skills of veteran staff, and expand to serve more families, and tap into funding streams that may provide you with the capacity to provide services in more unique and specialized ways? Time to brush up on those grant writing skills. This session will present strategies for researching potential funding sources, reviewing and understanding application and grant requirements, organizing and focusing your proposal, and bolster your overall grant writing skills.
Choose One (1) Day 1 Afternoon Session to Attend: *

Day One Late Afternoon Session:
3:00 pm-4:30 pm
(Choose one session to attend.)

1.N. Outcomes Workshop: How to Write Meaningful, Functional Outcomes (Part 2 of 2)
Participants who enroll in Part 1 of this two-part session will automatically be enrolled in Part 2.
 
1.O. Privilege and Prejudice: Addressing Hidden Biases (Part 2 of 2)
Participants who enroll in Part 1 of this two-part session will automatically be enrolled in Part 2.
 
1.P. Cultivating Cultural Humility (Part 2 of 2)
Participants who enroll in Part 1 of this two-part session will automatically be enrolled in Part 2.
 
1.Q. Motivational Interviewing: Supporting Relationships and Imbedding Motivational Interviewing – Personally and Organizationally (Part 2 of 2)
Participants who enroll in Part 1 of this two-part session will automatically be enrolled in Part 2.

1.R. Learning from the Experts: Best Practices in Supporting and Serving Children with Hearing and Vision Impairments and Their Families (Part 2 of 2)
Participants who enroll in Part 1 of this two-part session will automatically be enrolled in Part 2.
 
1.S. Reaching and Supporting Young Parents
Eileen Crumm, Family Resource Navigators; Kaitlin Perry, Perry Communications Group
It’s not hard these days to find strategies for connecting with millennials and “Generation Z,” often characterized as being technologically engaged. But what really works? As Early Start serves more families with parents who represent a younger generation, how can Early Start professionals provide information and support to these families? Presenters will dispel myths and discuss effective strategies for engaging and supporting young parents in early intervention.
 
1.T. Successful Models for Including Fathers
Kevin Bremond, First 5 Alameda; parent partner TBA
This session will focus on changing our paradigm and biases related to fathers, and address some of the challenges and barriers fathers face in participating in their child’s lives. By coming to understand the father’s perspective, we can be better equipped in finding meaningful ways of including fathers. This session will discuss the model implemented by First 5 Alameda Father Corps, and some of the barriers and challenges of implementing this program. Learn about community response and engagement, and how other programs and agencies can incorporate this model into reaching fathers of children served by Early Start.
Choose One (1) Day 1 Late Afternoon Session to Attend:
NOTE: If you selected a 2-part session above (sessions 1.G.-1.K.), you will automatically be enrolled in Part 2 of that session.
 *

Afternoon Convening and Networking Reception
4:30 pm-6:00 pm

Afternoon Convening and Networking Reception
Participants will briefly come together at the end of Day 1 before breaking for an optional networking reception with hosted appetizers. More details to come!

Day Two General Session
9:00 am-10:15 am
(All registrants attend the general session.)

Bringing Cultural Humility to Reflective Practice
Barbara Stroud, Ph.D., California Association for Infant Mental Health
Reflective Practice strategies require us to look inside our experience to ensure we are offering family-driven services uninfluenced by our personal agendas. How do we push into the uncomfortable places where internal biases live, and recognize that they may be unconsciously influencing the self-determined family service agenda? Through Reflective Practice, participants will learn to explore those hidden and uncomfortable places, and move towards providing family-centered services and supports. Participants will come to understand that the barrier to cultural humility is not personal biases, but rather the lack of awareness of implicit agendas. This Keynote will help participants learn that through Reflective Practice we can start to break down those barriers to providing culturally humble, family-centered services and supports.

Day Two Morning Session:
10:30 am-12:00 pm
(Choose one session to attend.)

2.A. Reflective Practice Level 1: RP 101
Richard Cohen, Ph.D.
Reflective practice is taking time to think about our work and make it better in the future. Who has time for that? You do. Learn the basics of reflective practice and how to use this process to improve your interactions with staff and support existing and new team members develop in meaningful and healthy ways.

2.B. Trauma-Informed Practices in Early Intervention
Cheryl Williams-Jackson, Psy.D., Modesto Junior College and WJ Developmental Consultants
Participants will learn how to effectively provide supports and services to young children and their families who have experienced trauma. Presenters will discuss the impacts of different forms of trauma on children and families, and will share strategies, tools, and resources for Early Start professionals to recognize and address trauma.

2.C. Connecting Families to California Children’s Services
Ali Barclay, Family Voices; Laurie Soman, Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital
California Children’s Services (CCS) helps eligible children with special health needs and their families receive medical care and case management. In this presentation, participants will find out more about the available programs through CCS, the eligibility criteria, and how to get families connected to these services and supports. Participants will also learn about the CCS Whole Child Model (WCM), including its benefits for families, what counties are changing to WCM and how Early Start professionals can work in collaboration to support families during the transition to WCM.

2.D. Autism EBPs from CAPTAIN
Diane Storman, Jennifer Fisher, and Mary Rettinhouse, CAPTAIN
California’s Autism Professional Training and Information Network (CAPTAIN) is a multiagency network of trainers whose goal is to increase the early identification of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) and the use of evidence-based practices (EBPs) in early intervention for ASD. In this presentation, participants will learn about EBPs for intervention with young children with ASD, including how these EBPs are determined, what constitutes an EBP, the various levels of EBPs, and who should use EBPs.                           

2.E.  The Impact of Prenatal Substance Use.
Kenneth Jones, M.D., University of California, San Diego
How does prenatal substance use affect babies and toddlers? What does prenatal substance use mean for finding children eligible for Early Start? Where can Early Start professionals find accurate information to share with families, and how can they navigate difficult conversations about substance use? This session answers these questions and more, as presenters discuss the effects of substance use during and after pregnancy on children who may be eligible for Early Start.
 
2.F. Adapting Social and Emotional Strategies for Parents of Children with Medical and Sensory Needs
Eileen Crumm, Family Resource Navigators; Fran Goldfarb, University of Southern California
Meeting the social and emotional needs of infants and toddlers with physical, sensory, and health needs may look different from other families, but it’s both possible and important! Learn how to support parents in creatively adapting their interactions with their children whose medical, sensory, or other conditions may pose a challenge to implementing many social and emotional development tips. Presenters discuss strategies for professionals to have strength-based conversations that will help parents connect in creative ways with their infants and toddlers, and also identify and celebrate the unique ways they already are!

2.G. More Than a Footnote: How to Work Effectively with Underrepresented Families
Pablo Velez, Amigo Baby; Mary Sheppard, California Department of Social Services; Susie Terry, San Diego County Office of Education 
Part of becoming a culturally competent professional is learning how to work effectively with children and families whose circumstances present unique barriers to supports and services. What are the challenges that families who are homeless or living in poverty and children who are in foster care experience? How can Early Start professionals best identify and support these families? This session offers timely information and practical strategies for reaching and serving underrepresented families in the community.
Choose One (1) Day Two Morning Session to Attend: *

Day Two Afternoon Session:
1:15 pm-2:45 pm
(Choose one session to attend.)

2.H.  Reflective Practice Level 2: Overcoming Challenges to Implementation
Richard Cohen, Ph.D.
This session will facilitate conversation around the barriers and challenges of sustaining reflective practice and coaching staff. Explore how organizations allocate time for skill-building, integrate mentoring and consultation, and model coaching behavior. Come to a better understanding about whether barriers are technical or adaptive and how can they be addressed.

2.I.  Ask the Experts: Accessing Insurance for Early Start Services
Katie Hornberger and Maria Iriarte, Disability Rights California; Erin Sullivan-Pico, Department of Managed Health Care Services; co-panelists TBA
Accessing insurance for Early Start services continues to be a complicated process for both service coordinators and families. This panel discussion will bring together all the experts in the areas of insurance and access. This interactive session will cover information concerning the use of public or private insurance for early intervention therapy services. Presenters will discuss developmental vs. medical services, covered services, what to do when there are no providers available in the network, and what to do when a service is denied.
 
2.J. You Can’t Pour from an Empty Cup: Self-Care and Resolving Vicarious Trauma
Cheryl-Williams Jackson, Ph.D., Modesto Junior College and WJ Developmental Consultants
How do we address burnout and make sure we are attending to our own self-care and wellness? Learn how to mitigate the impacts of vicarious trauma on your work with children and their families. 
 
2.K. Impacts of Trauma and Poverty on Brain Development
Sara Torten, Amigo Baby
Research is emerging indicating that low socioeconomic status has been linked to structural changes in the brain with poorer neurocognitive functions across numerous domains including language, self-regulation, memory, and social and emotional processing. Learn about the effects of poverty on the developing brain, and what factors mediate the relationship between poverty and brain structure. Be introduced to some of the most current research on this emerging subfield of neuroscience. Take away strategies that can be used in early intervention to support the development of children living in poverty.
 
2.L. The Community Resiliency Model® (CRM): Wellness Skills of the Trauma Resiliency Model
Elaine Miller Karas, LCSW, Trauma Resource Institute
Natural disasters like the most recent fires in California can and do disrupt the fabric of our lives. The Community Resiliency Model (CRM) explores the concept of resiliency and how to restore balance to the body and the mind after traumatic experiences. CRM was developed in order to bring the model to regions that have been impacted by natural and human-made disasters. CRM trains community members to help themselves, and others within their wider social network. The primary focus of the training program is to educate participants about the biology and neurophysiology of trauma and stress, as well as how to teach simple biologically-based wellness skills to staff, peers, and families.
 
2.M. Letting Things Get Messy: Understanding Developmental Milestones and Social and Emotional Regulation
Joanne Brady, San Diego State University
When do behaviors need to be addressed? Behaviors that adults interpret as “challenging” are usually communicating a child’s need. This session will provide a review of developmental milestones and strategies for recognizing and understanding dysregulated behavior and facilitating social and emotional regulation in infants and toddlers.
Choose One (1) Day Two Afternoon Session to Attend: *